Hear Me Roar: Lions in Regency England

A Pair of Regency Giltwood Lions Mackinnon Fine Furniture Collection

A Pair of Regency Giltwood Lions Mackinnon Fine Furniture Collection

Lions are the undisputed kings of the jungle.  But where do they fit into English history?  As early as King John’s reign in England around 1210, lions were said to be kept at the Tower of London menagerie.  Medieval English warriors who had a reputation for bravery were often nicknamed ‘the Lion’: Richard I of England, for example, was known as Richard the Lionheart.

Trafalgar Square.jpg

The lions at the base of Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square 

Lions can be found on English heraldry and in sculptures as a symbol of national heritage.  Four lions designed by Edwin Landseer guard the base of Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square.

Number 10 Downing Street

Number 10, Downing Street with a lion’s head door knocker

If you walk down almost any street in London you will easily spot lion head brass door knockers on traditional Georgian townhouses… including Number 10, Downing Street.

A Pair of Regency Giltwood Lions Mackinnon Fine Furniture Collection

A Pair of Regency Giltwood Lions Mackinnon Fine Furniture Collection

We are delighted to share one of our latest acquisitions: an outstanding pair of Regency carved giltwood lions standing on plinths.  The lions feature wonderful expressive faces and retain their original gilding.  These jungle kings are a quintessential symbol of English history: medieval, Regency, and today.

 

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