When Cabinet-Makers Unite: A Love Story

We may not know a great deal about the day to day lives of 18th century cabinet-makers, but there is one (romantic!) story that deserves attention. The renowned cabinet-maker Giles Grendey (who we have discussed here and here), had seven children: Mary, Elizabeth, Mary (another one), another daughter, Sukey, and Sam. Sukey went on to … Continue reading When Cabinet-Makers Unite: A Love Story

It Runs in the Family: The Incredible Gillows Family of Cabinetmakers

Today we are shining a spotlight on one of the most successful cabinetmaking firms of the 18th and 19th century: Gillows of Lancaster & London.  (For information on other cabinetmakers, look here: Thomas Chippendale, William Gomm, and Pierre Langlois).  The Gillows family firm was established in Lancaster as early as the 1730s.  Throughout the eighteenth … Continue reading It Runs in the Family: The Incredible Gillows Family of Cabinetmakers

The Art of Furniture Encyclopedia: Mayhew & Ince

We are continuing our series entitled The Art of Furniture, an online encyclopedia of furniture and decorative arts.  In our previous posts, we looked at Queen Anne and the furniture associated with her reign followed by a look at a particular material and style, burr. Today we are highlighting the work of an influential cabinetmaking … Continue reading The Art of Furniture Encyclopedia: Mayhew & Ince

The ABCs of the Decorative Arts: Imbrication

Our next stop on the alphabet of the decorative arts is imbrication.  Although this word may be unfamiliar now, you will soon start spotting this decorative feature everywhere.  Imbrication is decorative style featuring overlapping patterns, such as tiles on a roof or scales.  The word comes from the Latin imbricare 'to cover with tiles.'   The style first … Continue reading The ABCs of the Decorative Arts: Imbrication