Friday Finds: A Look Back at the Archives

Detail from the George I scarlet japanned mule chest, Mackinnon Fine Furniture Collection We are continuing our tradition of Friday Finds with a look back at the archives - today, we are exploring the history of the George I scarlet japanned mule chest in our collection. Antique furniture is not only defined by its age--it is also reflective of … Continue reading Friday Finds: A Look Back at the Archives

Take a Look Inside: A George III Chippendale Chest of Drawers

Whenever we share photographs of a piece of furniture in our collection, we almost always show either a front on view or an angled view to show more three dimensional detail.  But with furniture, it is just as important to take a closer look inside: especially when there are drawers, doors, or other interior compartments. … Continue reading Take a Look Inside: A George III Chippendale Chest of Drawers

Exhibition Spotlight: The Hagley Hall Side Chairs

Our exhibition spotlight today is this outstanding pair of George III carved mahogany and upholstered side chairs, attributed to the Royal cabinet-makers William Vile and John Cobb.  The serpentine-shaped upholstered backs and seats are above wonderful carved seat frames and exaggerated cabriole legs terminating in scroll feet.  The carving is of exceptional quality and crispness. … Continue reading Exhibition Spotlight: The Hagley Hall Side Chairs

The Art of the Fold: A History of Decorative Screens in the Interior

Several months ago we looked at Chinese lacquer screens and their history.  Today we will focus on the broader history of screens and how they became a popular and fashionable item in Georgian England and Continental Europe.  The painting entitled The New Song by Jan Josef Horemans depicts an interior scene with a group of men … Continue reading The Art of the Fold: A History of Decorative Screens in the Interior

The ABCs of the Decorative Arts: Imbrication

Our next stop on the alphabet of the decorative arts is imbrication.  Although this word may be unfamiliar now, you will soon start spotting this decorative feature everywhere.  Imbrication is decorative style featuring overlapping patterns, such as tiles on a roof or scales.  The word comes from the Latin imbricare 'to cover with tiles.'   The style first … Continue reading The ABCs of the Decorative Arts: Imbrication