Duties & Customs: Thomas Chippendale & His Wily Tricks

Paying duties and customs are part of any modern shipping process: but it certainly isn't anything new.  Back in the eighteenth century, customs and international trade agreements had a significant impact on the way art and furniture arrived in England.  For example, the Seven Years War greatly decreased trade between England and France, but it … Continue reading Duties & Customs: Thomas Chippendale & His Wily Tricks

Superbly Serpentine: A Sofa Designed in the Manner of Thomas Chippendale

We are no stranger to the designs and furniture of Thomas Chippendale (see here, here, and here for proof... or here, here, and here!).  This very fine 19th century mahogany double serpentine sofa is designed in the manner of Thomas Chippendale. The sofa features upholstered back, seat, and sides.  The mahogany show-frame is finely carved … Continue reading Superbly Serpentine: A Sofa Designed in the Manner of Thomas Chippendale

Irresistibly Irish : A George II Mahogany Armchair

We have looked at Irish furniture in the past on this blog, focusing on the qualities and idiosyncrasies that characterise Irish furniture.  Today we are focusing on one of our latest acquisitions: A George II Irish mahogany armchair. This chair features several hallmarks of Irish design, including the intricate interlaced and pierced back splat, carved … Continue reading Irresistibly Irish : A George II Mahogany Armchair

A Discovery in Durham: John Thompson and his Cabinetmaking Workshop

We recently acquired a superb George III octagonal mahogany library table.  We were delighted to find a drawer fixed with an original trade label for John Thompson of Durham.  Thompson was an interesting character and we are delighted to share our research on him today. John Thompson is recorded as working at Sadler Street in … Continue reading A Discovery in Durham: John Thompson and his Cabinetmaking Workshop

Take a Closer Look: A Set of Chairs with a Curious Stamp

English antique furniture from the 18th century, unlike its French counterpart, is rarely signed, stamped, or otherwise inscribed with the cabinetmaker's name.   There are, of course, exceptions to the rule.  The impressive suite of red japanned furniture made for Lazcano Palace by Giles Grendey features Grendey's trade label on several pieces of the suite (we … Continue reading Take a Closer Look: A Set of Chairs with a Curious Stamp

The ABCs of the Decorative Arts: Kneehole Desks

We continue our alphabetical tour of the decorative arts with the kneehole desk today.  This particular style of desk first appeared in England in the early 18th century.  The kneehole desk is defined by its 'kneehole' in the centre allowing the desk's user to comfortably sit with his or her legs underneath the writing surface.  … Continue reading The ABCs of the Decorative Arts: Kneehole Desks

Boy oh Boy: Lowboys and Tallboys (and Highboys)

Different types of furniture often have interesting names: Pembroke tables, wake tables, hope chests, Windsor chairs, grandfather clocks... the list goes on.  Today we are looking at two distinctly English forms of furniture: the lowboy and the tallboy. A tallboy is a double chest of drawers, or a wardrobe on a chest of drawers.  (In … Continue reading Boy oh Boy: Lowboys and Tallboys (and Highboys)