Seating in Silhouettte: Chairs in Profile

A George II walnut side chair attributed to Giles Grendey shown in profile Mackinnon Fine Furniture Collection Back by popular demand... we are looking at chairs from a different angle today. A George II walnut Gainsborough chair attributed to Giles Grendey Mackinnon Fine Furniture Collection You would always expect to see a chair front on, or perhaps at a … Continue reading Seating in Silhouettte: Chairs in Profile

France, Rome, and England: A Trio of Design Inspiration

We are delighted to share this superb quality George III Chippendale period carved mahogany open armchair that reflects English craftsmanship with inspiration from both Roman and French design sources.  The rectangular padded back, arms, and seat are upholstered in floral gros-point needlework, and the acanthus and shell-carved frame on foliate-cabriole legs terminate in scroll feet. … Continue reading France, Rome, and England: A Trio of Design Inspiration

The ABCs of Decorative Arts: Needlework

We are officially half of the way through our alphabetic tour of the decorative arts.  What better way to kick off the back half of the alphabet than with a great topic: needlework. The term needlework applies to handicraft that incorporates decorative sewing and textile arts.  Medieval needlework in the form of embroidery was often … Continue reading The ABCs of Decorative Arts: Needlework

An Upholsterer’s Dilemma: Picking Fabric for Antique Chairs

Sometimes, though not often, antique chairs retain their original upholstery: the Warwick Castle armchairs and Newhailes library chairs are two notable exceptions. When the time comes to choose fresh upholstery for antique chairs, there are a number of options to pick from, including silk damask, velvet (either plain or cut velvet), patterned silk, or needlework, to … Continue reading An Upholsterer’s Dilemma: Picking Fabric for Antique Chairs

Tuesdays are for Textiles: Antique Needlework Panels & Cushions

In 1770 the French designer Charles Germain de Saint-Aubin published a treatise on embroidery, L'Art du Brodeur, known in English as The Art of the Embroiderer.   As the Royal Embroiderer (Dessinateur du Roi pour la broderie et la entelle) to king Louis XV, Saint Aubin was responsible for crafting dresses, corsets, and festive costumes for the King … Continue reading Tuesdays are for Textiles: Antique Needlework Panels & Cushions