The Fanciful Designs of Thomas Johnson

Thomas Johnson was one of the most skilled carvers and furniture designers in Georgian England.  He was a champion of both the rococo movement and chinoiserie taste, and his elaborate designs often wove the two styles together. Johnson was born in 1723 as one of twelve children to a London builder and developer, Joel Johnson.  … Continue reading The Fanciful Designs of Thomas Johnson

The Perfect Pairing: A Louis XV Bombé Commode & Louis XV Giltwood Fauteuils

In our second instalment of 'The Perfect Pairing,' we are looking at two exceptional examples of 18th century French design that work beautifully in tandem.  Both of these pieces reflect the taste and style of the court of Louis XV with the incorporation of rococo motifs including curved forms and elaborate detailing. This very fine … Continue reading The Perfect Pairing: A Louis XV Bombé Commode & Louis XV Giltwood Fauteuils

A Most Curious Natural Art: The History of Shellwork

Shellwork pieces first appeared in the 17th century on boxes and caskets of the late Stuart period with decoration of rolled paper, and by the 18th century shellwork had become a popular craft often carried out by women.   Shellwork represented the growing fascination with discoveries of the natural world which fueled the Age of Enlightenment.  … Continue reading A Most Curious Natural Art: The History of Shellwork

When the Palladian Meets the Rococo: A George II White Painted Mirror

Today we are highlight a rare and fantastical mirror reflects the emergence of the rococo style in England, which developed in the wake of the Palladian revival earlier in the century.  This outstanding and highly important George II carved and painted mirror is in the manner of John Vardy, the architect, and his brother Thomas Vardy, … Continue reading When the Palladian Meets the Rococo: A George II White Painted Mirror